The Village Academy

The Village Academy is a group of town, city and village schools that have joined together to provide the very best education for the children in our care and where we believe that education is very much a matter of the individual.

Visit Site

 

  

 

 Class 2

 A message from the Class Teacher, Mrs Ormerod

 Term 2, 2020-2021

Dear Parents and Carers,

This term, we are considering the question, 'What did the Gunpowder Plot mean for England?'. Please see the topic web here which shows how we are exploring this question and also gives information on the focus of all the different areas of learning. The home learning menu is available here. You are welcome to choose two or more of the suggestions to support your child's learning at home.

If you have any questions or concerns, please either catch Miss Reiff or me at the end of the day or contact the school office.

With best wishes,

Mrs. Ormerod

Term 1 learning

 

Archived - Home Learning Activities March to July 2020

2019-20 Term 6

For the Home Learning Menu for Term 6, please click here.

To see the Topic Web for Term 6, please click here.

Home Learning Activities

Tips and techniques on how to keep your child calm, click here

If your child is worried about the pandemic, this story may help.

BBC Bitesize offers information, videos and activities for all subjects.

My Activity Pack

Click here for some games to support computer programming skills

Look for facts about Kenya and other places of interest here

For a whole range of interests, activities and quizzes, check out DK Findout!

To access reading books, go to Oxford Owls at home and set up an account

For more educational games linked to all subjects, click here

Want to use the seeds given out at school? Click here for a video on how to make seedbombs.

 

Home Learning Opportunities during school closure - weekly update

 

Week beginning: 13th July 2020

Hello everyone! I hope you are all well. Well done to all of you that are still persevering with home learning. I am sure that the children’s motivation is now waning so do not worry if you are struggling to motivate them! Remember, at this point in the year we would be winding down, enjoying lots of fun “end of term” activities and taking part in some transition activities. As always, feel free to do as much or as little of the work set out below. Take care everyone, Mrs Ormerod.

 

English

This week we will turn our attention to transition. If we were at school right now we would be thinking/talking about transition into year 3 so that the children are prepared for some of the changes as they move to a new classroom/teacher. To support this at home you could do one (or all) of the following activities:

  • Write a letter to your new teacher Mr Hardy. Tell him all about you, your interests, what you are good at, ask him any questions you have about year 3 and tell him what you are looking forwards to.
  • Write a letter to a child who is currently in year 1 but will be in year 2 next year. Tell them all about what it is like in year 2, what we learnt about, what you enjoyed, what things were different to year 1 and any advice you would give them about being in year 2.
  • Create a self-portrait using any medium you like (pens, pencils, crayons, paint, collage, on the computer) then surround it with information all about you.

Feel free to e-mail me pictures of any of the above that you choose to complete and I will make sure that Mr Hardy or the new Year 2 children receive a copy.

 

Topic

If we were at school right now, we would have been using all that we have learnt about protecting the environment by carrying out a project to help the environment. I would have let the children decide on the project but some ideas might have been:

  • Plastic pollution – what can we do as a school to reduce the amount of single use plastic we use? Create posters/a song/adverts to try to persuade children to use less plastic. Perhaps thinking about packed lunches, water bottles, snacks?
  • Research what different fruits and vegetables we could grow in the Goldsworthy Garden? Produce a calendar that shows what we could plant at different times of the year and when they would be ready. Could we use these as snacks at school?
  • Encouraging more animals (bees, butterflies, birds etc) to our school grounds? What are the benefits? What would we need to do? Design a bug hotel.
  • Make something "new" out of something we no longer need? Shopper bags out of old t-shirts for example?

You could choose one of the above activities or think of your own little project with the aim of doing something to help the environment.

Maths

As I mentioned last week, we would have spent the last 2 weeks of term recapping any areas of maths that we have found particularly tricky. I am going to attach some booklets and activity sheets that cover a whole range of mathematical skills. Do let me know (via e-mail) if there is something particular that you would like support with for your child, and it is not featured below.

Spelling

Focus: Common Exception Words

As you know, by the end of year 2, all children are expected to be able to read and spell these common exception words (in addition to these ones from year 1).

In our spelling lessons, we would have spent the last 2 weeks of term making sure we knew these words really well by carrying out various activities that practice reading and spelling them.

You might want start by giving them a little test to see which words they can’t read/spell so that you can focus just on these.

Once you know which words you need to practice, you could:

  • Play bingo with the common exception words
  • Write each word out several times on individual pieces of paper, now play snap or matching pairs
  • Make up silly sentences using as many of the target words as possible in a sentence

Science

We would have completed our learning on “Animals and their Habitats” by now so this week you could:

  • Log on to Purple Mash and go to the “Science” and then “animals” page where you will find lots of fun activities.
  • Draw a picture of your favourite animal in its habitat. You could then write a description of why that habitat is perfect for that animal.

 

 

 

 

 

Week beginning: 6th July 2020

Hello everyone! I hope you are all well. I can’t believe we are now in July, crazy to think that the first of these updates was all the way back in March. I do hope that as many of you as possible will be able to attend the transition afternoon – I can’t wait to see you all. Take care everyone, Mrs Ormerod.

 

English/Topic

This week we are continuing with our topic: How can we protect our environment?” and we are looking at poems that are themed around “The Environment.”

Click on the link below to read a selection of poems aimed at children. They are all centred on environmental issues and feature some beautiful illustrations too.

https://www.theguardian.com/childrens-books-site/gallery/2015/apr/24/poems-of-our-earth-in-pictures#img-1

After reading the poems, talk about the one(s) you enjoyed the most. Why did you choose that one? What was it about? Then choose one or two of the poems and talk about their features, such as how the poem is organised into verses, whether there is any rhyme or rhythm, the use of exciting adjectives, maybe there are some similes?

Then, have a go at creating your own poem that is something to do with what we have learnt about protecting the environment. It could be about an endangered animal you have found out about, or about the plastic pollution in the oceans or maybe about the need to recycle?

Your poem could take any form but here is some information on what an acrostic poem is and how to write one, with some templates here.

And here is some information on shape poems with some templates here.

When writing your poem, think really carefully about the words that you choose. Poems are shorter than stories so writers have to choose words wisely to make sure you bring your ideas to life.

Once you have written your poem, illustrate it with some beautiful pictures, just like the ones you looked at above.

You could also see if you can perform your poem. You will need to practice reading it over and over again so that you are really familiar with it. Pay attention to the rhythm of the poem. You may even be able to accompany it with some body percussion!

Maths

For the next 2 weeks in maths, we would have spent some time recapping any areas of maths that we have found particularly tricky. I am going to attach some booklets and activity sheets that cover a whole range of mathematical skills. Do let me know (via e-mail) if there is something particular that you would like support with for your child, and it is not featured below.

Spelling

Focus: Common Exception Words

As you know, by the end of year 2, all children are expected to be able to read and spell these common exception words (in addition to these ones from year 1).

In our spelling lessons, we would have spent the last 2 weeks of term making sure we knew these words really well by carrying out various activities that practice reading and spelling them.

You might want to start by giving them a little test to see which words they can’t read/spell so that you can focus just on these.

Once you know which words you need to practice, you could:

Science

Our science topic this term is “Living things and their habitats”. This week we are going to focus on food chains. You may remember when we looked at the book “If Sharks Disappeared” where we learnt about what could happen if sharks (top of their food chain) disappeared from our oceans. If you want to have another look at that book, here is the link again: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-J-3ZKS6tQI

Following on from that, take a look at this short video which explains food chains in a bit more detail:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/clips/z96r82p

Then, using this information, think about some of the habitats that we have looked at over the last few weeks and have a go at creating a food chain featuring the animals that live in that habitat (Arctic, Woodland, Ocean, Desert or maybe even some of the micro-habitats we looked at a few weeks ago). Remember that food chains start with a plant.

Or, you could use these photographs and this template to create some food chains.

 

 

 

Week beginning: 29th June 2020

Hello everyone! I hope you are all well. I only managed to speak to a few families last week so will continue with this on Monday. How did everyone cope with the heat last week? I bet there was lots of paddling pool fun! Take care everyone, Mrs Ormerod.

 

English/Topic

This week we are continuing with our topic: How can we protect our environment?” and we are finishing our work on the story, “The Tin Forest”.

You may want to watch/listen to the story again so I have included the link again here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_j_XPFxy5js

Once you have listened to the story you could:

  • Have a go at the comprehension questions about the story attached here. You could discuss your answers together and/or write answers down.
  • Time to get creative! Could you design/create something to be added to the Tin Forest? It could be something from the first part of the book or the ending (which is much more colourful!). Here are some pictures for inspiration:
  •     
  • Once you have designed/made your creation, try to explain it to someone else. What is it? Why does it look like that? What does it do? Why have you chosen those colours/materials?

Maths

In maths this week we would have spent time learning our multiplication and division facts for the 2, 5, 10 times tables. By this I mean that the children can recall answers to questions such as “3x5” and “40÷10”. If your child already knows all of these they can move onto the 3 and 4 times tables. To help practice these you could:

  • Use any or all of these activity sheets to practice

    2 X      5 X     10 X    3X      4X

  • Play this game set to the times table you want to practice:

     https://www.topmarks.co.uk/maths-games/hit-the-button

  • Write out the times table and division questions on individual pieces of paper. Then put the answers on separate individual pieces of paper. How quickly can you match them all up? Play pelmanism with them which is when you turn all the pieces of paper over and try to turn over matching pairs.
  • At the end of the week, have a go at one (or all!) of these challenge sheets. How quickly can you do it?

    2, 5, 10 X challenge      3X challenge

Spelling

Focus: The “l” or “el” sounds spelt with an “il” at the end of words

Example words: pencil, fossil, nostril, stencil, pupil

Remind children that we have already learnt that the “le” “al” and “el” letters can make this sound at the end of a word. Have a quick read of these words for a reminder.

Show the target words and elicit the common sound and then the letters that are making that sound. Explain that the “il” is another way to make the “l”/”el” sound at the end of a word but it is an unusual one.

Practice writing the words out a few times. Can you think of any other words that have this spelling pattern?

You could then have a go at this activity sheet that practices this spelling rule.

Science

Our science topic this term is “Living things and their habitats”. Having looked at local habitats, micro-habitats and world habitats, this week we are going to look at how animals are suited to their habitats and how living things in a habitat depend on each other. Take a look at the power-point here which gives some information about dependency in habitats.

Once you have looked at the power-point, you could have a go at one of the activity sheets here. You don’t need to do all of them, just choose the one you think is at the right level for your child.

You could also watch a recording of the lovely story “Sally and the Limpet” here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HX8vgBF1_G8

and talk about why the limpet needed to return to its natural habitat rather than stay on Sally’s finger!

 

 

 

 

Week beginning: 23rd June 2020

Hello everyone! I hope you are all well. I will be ringing round families this week so very much look forward to speaking to you all. I have received some fantastic e-mails from a few families, some with photos of what you have been up to – I love receiving these so please keep them coming! Take care everyone, Mrs Ormerod.

 

English/Topic

This week we are continuing with our topic: How can we protect our environment?” and we are continuing with the story, “The Tin Forest”.

You may want to watch/listen to the story again so I have included the link again here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_j_XPFxy5js

Once you have listened to the story you could:

  • Imagine the old man needed someone to help him look after the Tin Forest. Create a job advert that he might use. You’ll need to write a job description for the position – what daily tasks would the applicant be expected to do? Would they stay at the tin forest too? What sort of a person might the old man want to work with? What would their characteristics need to be like? You could use a template like the one attached here or feel free to create your own format.
  • There are lots of past tense verbs in the story. Can you listen out for them and write some of them down? Sort them into 2 groups of regular past tense verbs (end in –ed) and irregular. E.g, played/ate
  • Last week we thought about what our carbon footprint is, different ways that we use energy and then maybe some ways to reduce our carbon footprint. This week I would like you to try and persuade others to reduce their carbon footprint. You might want to take another look at the powerpoint that I posted last week which included some suggestions of how we can reduce and even offset our carbon footprint. Think of a way to share all of that information with others – it could be in a poster, or maybe you want to write a letter to other members of our school community or someone in your family? You could even create a short video! Tell them what a “carbon footprint” is; the damage that is being done and then importantly, what they can do to help.

Maths

In maths this week we would have been looking at data handling which is collecting and presenting data.

  • To start with, watch this BBC video on what a block graph is and how to create one: https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/clips/zkf34wx
  • You could also take a look at this BBC video which explains pictograms and explores what happens when one picture represents more than one piece of “data”:

     https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/clips/zg4d2hv

  • Then have a look at this made-up data I have created on animals that you can find in different world habitats (link to science work below!). Choose one of the world habitats and see if you can create a block diagram or a pictogram using the data. To make it a bit more challenging make it so that each picture represents more than 1 animal. What would happen if you had an odd number?
  • You will see that that there is no data for the Ocean habitat. See if you can add some of your own and then you could create another block diagram or pictogram.
  • When you have completed your diagrams, ask an adult to ask you some questions such as: What is the most/least common animal? How many “animal” and “animal” are there altogether? How many animals were counted altogether? If 10/20/30 more “animal” were added, how many would there be? And what about the total animal number?

Spelling

Focus: The “u” sound spelt with an “o”

Example words: mother, brother, other, nothing, none, discover

Start by writing out the words and asking your child to read them. What do they notice about the words? What is the same about them? What letter/s do they think are making that sound? Discuss how it is unusual for an “u” to make an “o” sound.

Practice writing the words out a few times. Can you think of any other words that have this spelling pattern?

You could then have a go at any or all of these activity sheets that practice this spelling rule:

Sheet 1     Sheet 2       Sheet 3

 

Science

Our science topic this term is “Living things and their habitats”. Having looked at local and micro-habitats, this week we are going to look at world habitats. Take a look at the power-point here which gives some information about different world habitats such as the rainforest and the Arctic. And/or you could take a look at these BBC Bitesize videos, each of which is accompanied by some games and quizzes:

Polar habitats: https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zx882hv/articles/z3sr4wx

Ocean habitats: https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zx882hv/articles/zsfkd2p

Rainforest habitats: https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zx882hv/articles/zxdsvcw

Desert habitats: https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zx882hv/articles/zsqnfg8

Once you have found out about some world habitats you could choose your favourite animal and draw a picture of it in its habitat. Label it with information about its habitat such as food that can be found there or how the animal is suited to its environment.

Week beginning: 15th June 2020

Hello everyone! I hope you are all well. Did anyone manage to take part in any of the Ocean Day activities? My children and I watched the short video of what should and shouldn’t be in a whale’s stomach and we also listened to the lovely reading of “Somebody Swallowed Stanley”. Both really interesting and made us think about our part in protecting the Ocean from plastic pollution. At the top of this page is the Home Learning Menu for Term 6 where you will find a variety of activities you can choose from, all linked to our topic for this term. Take care everyone, Mrs Ormerod.

 

English/Topic

This week we are continuing with our topic: “How can we protect our environment?” and we are focusing on a beautiful book called “The Tin Forest”.

Follow this link to watch a recording of the story being read:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_j_XPFxy5js

Once you have listened to the story you could:

  • Focus on the part where the old man dreams of living in a jungle. How did he describe the jungle? Write down some of the descriptions he used and then see if you can create a picture of the old man’s dream.
  • The old man was dreaming of an ideal place to live – what would your ideal place look like? Would it be in the jungle like the old man? Would it be at the coast? In the woods or maybe it would be in a completely made up place? Draw a picture and then write a description of what your ideal place to live would be like. When writing your description, think about what it might look like, what it might smell like, what animals or other humans might live there? Try to use some exciting adjectives in your description and maybe some adverbs too that might help to describe how the animals move for example. You might also try to include some similes, comparing parts of your ideal place to something else. Please see here for a list of some adjectives that you might like to use and here for some useful adverbs.
  • If we were at school we would be learning about our carbon footprint this week and its impact on the environment. You might like to read through this powerpoint together which explains it a little bit. Once you have read the powerpoint you might want to talk about all the things you do in a day that use energy. You could then use this activity sheet to write down some of the things that you could do to reduce your carbon footprint.

Maths

In maths this week we would have been revisiting time.

  • For some of the activities the children will need to know that there are 7 days in one week, the order of the days, that there are 12 months in a year and the order of the months. If you think they need to recap this, you might want to practise that first. To practise the order of the days, you could play this game:

     https://www.roythezebra.com/reading-games-high-frequency-words.html

     And to practise the order of the months, you could play this  game:  

     https://www.turtlediary.com/game/months-of-the-year.html

  • Here are some differentiated activity sheets to practice reading the time. Each sheet gets a little bit harder.
  • Here are some differentiated activity sheets that practice sequencing times.
  • Finally, here are some differentiated time word problems.
  • I have also updated mathletics and set some time questions work for those children that have completed previously allocated tasks.

 

Spelling

Focus: Homophones (words that sound the same but have a different meaning and may have a different spelling)

Example words: grown, groan, great, grate, hear, here, mail, male, plane, plain, scene, seen, berry, bury

We have already learnt about homophones this year so they should be familiar to the children. This week is an opportunity to practice spelling some more of them.

Watch this video and do the activities that accompany it:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zqhpk2p/articles/zc84cwx

You could then have a go at any (or all!) of these activity sheets.

Sheet 1     Sheet 2     Sheet 3

In addition, you could also have a go at making the fortune teller here.

Science

Our science topic this term is “Living things and their habitats”. This week, we are going to look at micro-habitats. A micro-habitat is a small-scale, specific habitat which supports the survival of certain animals or plants. For instance, a rockpool or a rotting log. I wonder how many different micro-habitats you can think of? Where might you find some in your garden or out on the street or in the park?

Take a look at the power-point here which gives some more information and activity ideas.

You could also do the activity sheet attached here.

Or of course, you could just go on a micro-habitat hunt! See what you can find, tell your family about the animals/plants you found living there and think about why they are living there and not somewhere else.

When you have completed your work on micro-habitats you could then have a go at the quiz here:

https://www.educationquizzes.com/ks1/science/living-things-minibeasts-and-micro-habitats/

 

 

 

Week beginning:  8thJune 2020

Hello everyone! I hope you are all well and that you had a good first week back doing the Home Learning. I’m a little sad that the sun seems to have left us but at least the rain is doing a great job of providing water for the grass and plants. Take care everyone, Mrs Ormerod.

 

English/Topic

This week we are continuing with our topic: “How can we protect our environment?” and we are focusing on our Oceans; what is so special about them and what is the impact of plastic pollution. Monday 8th June is World Ocean Day and many of the activities I am going to suggest for this week are linked to here: https://worldoceanday.school/

From Monday you will be able to watch and join in with the many activities that have been put together on the above website and hopefully have some fun as well as learning about some very important issues.

Obviously, feel free to join in with any of the sessions on the virtual festival but I have highlighted a few here that I think would be particularly relevant:

  • Watch live at 10:30 (or afterwards if the time is not convenient!), when the Ocean Conservation Trust will be exploring the contents of a whale’s stomach! They will be looking at what is supposed to be there and what is not. They raise the important issue of single-use plastics and how these are having a huge impact on not just the ocean and ocean animals but the whole planet in general. Attached here is a survey you and your child can undertake together that challenges you to find all the single use plastic items in your household and then encourages you to think of alternatives.
  • Following on from that, here is a power-point that goes through the impact that plastic can have on the ocean and its animals. At the end of the power-point there are some activities suggested.
  • At 1pm there will be a story session with the author of the book “Somebody swallowed Stanley”. This is one of the books I would have used with the class this term to help raise awareness of environmental issues so I’m sure they would enjoy listening to it.
  • Take a look here at a comic book guide that has been put together to educate young children on plastic pollution. There are some fun activities to do as well as lots of information on plastic.
  • Attached here are some fact cards about ocean animals which can be used with the questions attached here.
  • Once you have watched some videos and/or done some reading, maybe you could create a poster telling someone all about what you have learnt on Oceans and the impact of plastic pollution.

I’d love to hear about or see some of the activities you complete. Please feel free to e-mail photos to me on the e-mail address I gave you when we last spoke.

 

Maths

In maths this week we would have been revisiting fractions. The children have learnt about fractions before but it was quite a while ago so they may need some reminding!

    And this video: https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/z3rbg82/articles/zt7nfrd may help

  • Have a go at the attached sheet here looking at fractions of shapes. There are 3 different levels so choose the level that you think is right for your child.
  • Finally, we would then revise finding fractions of an amount. This video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PhvaEBKtHEQ goes over the method that we have previously taught in year 2. You can then have a go at one of the sheets attached here.
  • I have also updated mathletics and set some fraction work for those children that have completed previously allocated tasks.

Spelling

Focus: Words ending with the “l” or “el” sound but spelt with “al”

Example words: metal, pedal, capital, hospital, animal, petal, loyal, virtual

We have already learnt about the “l”/”el” sound at the end of a word being spelt in different ways, for example with a “le”. This week we are looking at another way to spell that sound, this time using “al”.

Read the example words above and isolate the end sound and the spelling of it.

Practice writing the words a few times and then put them into sentences.

Can you think of any other words spelt in this way?

Have a go at the activity sheet attached here.

Science

Our science topic this term is “Living things and their habitats”. This week we are going to look at some of the different animal habitats that you might find in your local area.

Have a look at the power-point attached here which goes through some different habitats (urban, woodland, pond, coastal) and looks at how the livings things that live there have adapted to that habitat.

Then have a go at the attached activity here where you can investigate a habitat local to you, maybe your garden or the local park, beach or woodland.

Attached here is a habitat game that you might like to play and here are some habitat word-searches that feature some useful vocabulary.

 

 

 

 

Week beginning: 1st June 2020

Hello everyone! I hope you are all well and that you had an enjoyable half term – the glorious weather certainly helped didn’t it? As I mentioned to you all before half term, feel free to e-mail me pictures of any bits of work you would like to share, I love seeing them! Take care, Mrs Ormerod.

 

Maths

For maths this week we are recapping our addition, subtraction, division and multiplication skills.

Please see here for some differentiated addition questions.

Please see here for some differentiated subtraction questions.

Please see here for some differentiated division questions.

Have a go at this game to practice your multiplication skills:

https://www.topmarks.co.uk/maths-games/hit-the-button

Ask a grown-up to set the game to practice x2, x5 or x10. When trying to answer the questions, think about counting in steps of that number. For example, if the question is 4x2, count in 2’s, 4 times (2, 4, 6, 8).

 

English/Topic

Our new topic for Term 6 is How can we protect our environment?” Obviously, this is an incredibly important topic and I hope that between us all we can raise awareness of some of the many environmental issues that we currently face. Next Monday (June 8th) is World Ocean Day and next week I will be setting some activities linked to this. In preparation, this week we are looking at the beautiful non-fiction book “If Sharks Disappeared” by Lily Williams. Please see a reading of the book here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-J-3ZKS6tQI

Once you have enjoyed listening to the book, you could do any of these activities:

  • Using the information from the book, write some sentences starting with “If sharks disappeared…”
  • Make a list of some of the other sea animals mentioned in the book. Can you put them into alphabetical order?
  • Listen out for some words that you are unsure of – such as “ecosystem”, “overfishing”, “species” – can you find out what they mean and create a glossary for the book?
  • Can you find out a bit more about “overfishing”, which is the reason given as the main threat to sharks. Take a look here: http://www.eschooltoday.com/overfishing/what-is-overfishing-for-kids.html
  • What would you say to someone who thought it was ok to fish as much as we want?
  • Could you create some art work about life under the sea? A collage maybe or a sketch of your favourite sea animal?
  • Click here to print a template to make a paper model of a shark

Spelling

Focus: The Possessive apostrophe (singular nouns)

We have already learnt about the possessive apostrophe (singular nouns) this year so this should (hopefully) be a review.

Recap what “possession” means and the rules for adding an apostrophe and an “s”.

Possession means when something belongs to someone or something.

When we need to say that something belongs to someone or something singular, we put an apostrophe and then an “s” at the end of the name it belongs to:

“The man’s bike”

“Rachel’s eyes are brown”

“The dog’s bone is hidden”

Please see here for some differentiated activity sheets you could complete.

Science

Our science topic this term is “Living things and their habitats”. This week we are going to start off the topic by looking at how we classify things that are “dead”, “alive” or “have never been alive”. Take a look at the following video for an introduction:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/z6882hv/articles/zs73r82

What were the things that were mentioned that mean something is “alive”? These are called life processes. Choose a living thing and then complete the activity sheet here.

 

 

 

 Week beginning: 18th May 2020

Hello everyone, I hope you are all well. The sunshine has helped this week hasn’t it? It’s also been nice to be able to venture a little further afield for a walk. Stay safe everyone and take care, Mrs Ormerod.

 

Maths

This week we would have been recapping some of the areas that the children have found tricky during the term. Feel free to choose any area that you feel your child needs some extra practice with. Here are some activities that will allow them to recap a variety of maths areas:

  • Do some more of the word problems sent home last week. Here are a few more that also involve money. Remember to look back over the tips I gave last week for how we would teach this in class and also the methods on the crib sheets posted over the last few weeks.
  • Recap telling the time to the hour, half hour, 15 minute interval and for an extra challenge, 1 min intervals. Please see here for an activity sheet to recap some of these and here and here for some activity cards.
  • Recap 2D and 3D shapes. See here and here for some resources to support this. Can you name them all? Can you describe some of their properties? Can you find any examples of these shapes around your home?

 

English/Topic

Now that we have done all of our learning on the Great Fire of London, this week I would like you to use some of that information and write a story about a fictional or real character set during the time of the Great Fire. Here are a few suggestions to get you thinking but feel free to be as creative as you like!

  • You could change the title of the original story to a character of your choice (maybe it’s you!). What would their experience be? Maybe your character had to alert neighbours? Or help put out the fire? Maybe your character had to find a way to get your family to safety across the river? How did they do it? Maybe they got lost?
  • Your new character could be an animal, maybe a cat or even a rat! What might their story be?
  • Perhaps your story takes place after the Great Fire when London has been re-built. Maybe your character has a new home or job?

 

Please see here for a checklist of how to write a good story.

Please see here for an example of a planning sheet that might help you to plan your story and put your ideas together.

And please see here for a checklist of what you should try to include in your writing.

When you have written your story you could make yourself a book using some folded A4 paper/card and copy your finished story into it. Don’t forget to bring your story to life with some illustrations.

Please see here for some further ideas of activities you could do associated with this topic.

Spelling

Focus: adding suffixes “ment” and “ness”

Elicit what the children can remember about adding suffixes to root words such as:

 “er” copy=copier  “est” happy=happiest  “ly” happy=happily

This week going to look at adding 2 more suffixes to root words, “ment” and “ness”.

Please see here for some examples of root words that you can add the suffixes to.

Practice adding the suffixes, what do the children notice about the spelling? What happens to the words ending in “y” when you add the suffix “ness”. What happens to the type of word that is? (It changes from an adjective to a noun that describes a state of being. Do not worry too much about that latter bit as it is hard to understand!).

Practice making the words, write them out a few times, put them into sentences and try to remember how to spell them by the end of the week.

 

Science

Did you manage to do any of the activities suggested in the links last week? I have attached them here again in case you want to take another look.

 

https://schoolgardening.rhs.org.uk/Resources/Activity/Art-from-the-garden

https://schoolgardening.rhs.org.uk/Resources/Spotter-Guide/Be-a-flower-spotter

https://schoolgardening.rhs.org.uk/Resources/Spotter-Guide/flowering-weeds-spotter

 

For something different, here is a link to an art tutorial that shows you step by step how to draw a hibiscus flower:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ao2IP7f23-8

If you enjoy that perhaps have a look for others that show how to draw different flowers. Can you find out any information about the flower you have drawn?

 

 

Week beginning: 11th May 2020

Hello everyone, I hope you are all well. Again, it was lovely talking with most of you last week. I still have a few families to catch up with so I will endeavour to do this early this week. It was great to hear what the children have been up to, whether that is activities I have suggested, or other opportunities that you are providing. Take care, Mrs Ormerod.

 

Maths

This week we would have been learning about word problems involving all 4 operations. Using the methods you have been practising over the last couple of weeks, try to solve some of the word problems that are attached below.

When we work these out in class we:

  1. Make sure we read the problem at least twice before we try to work it out.
  2. After reading the question, we then write down what the maths calculation is that we need to do (do we need to add, subtract, multiply or divide?). Look at the words used in the question to give you a clue – if there are words like “altogether” or “another” then you probably need to add or if there are words like “how many would be left”, then you probably need to subtract.
  3. Then, we show our working out using one of the methods practised over the last couple of weeks.
  4. Finally, we check our answer to make sure we are happy with it. Does it “make sense?” For example, if the question mentioned that some items were given away our answer should be smaller than what we started with!

See here for some addition and subtraction problems. You do not need to do all of them, just choose a few to have a go at.

See here for some 2-step addition and subtraction problems which take a bit more working out!

See here for some multiplication and division questions. They get harder as you move down the page so choose the questions you think are right for your child.

Word of warning: lots of children find these types of question quite tricky. Sometimes I find that “drawing” the question helps the children visualise what is going on if they can’t imagine it in their heads.

 

English/Topic

This week we would have been thinking about what happened after the Great Fire of London and how London was re-built. King Charles 11 made a speech to the people of London setting out his plans but I wonder what your plans would have been if you were the King/Queen at the time? I would like you to write a speech to the people of London setting out your plans to re-build the city of London. Take a look here for some questions you might want to consider when forming your ideas. Your speech might also have some illustrations to go alongside it.

Once you have written your speech practice reading it aloud to members of your family. Are they convinced by your ideas?

When you have finished you could also:

Watch this video that shows 2 children going back in time to 1666. Focus on the ending when it shows how London was rebuilt. Were any of your ideas mentioned? 

Watch this fun and interactive video from the Museum of London which is also full of activities for you to do. Again, pay close attention to the ending where it shows how London was re-built. Were your ideas mentioned?  

Sir Christopher Wren was the architect who was appointed by the King to plan the re-build of London. In addition to planning how to ensure something like this never happened again, he designed The Monument in London.

  • Can you find out why he wanted this built?                          
  • Where exactly is it?
  • You could draw a picture of it or maybe even make a model of it?                     

 

Spelling

Focus: words with the “or” sound spelt “ar” after a “w”

Recap the spelling from a couple of weeks ago when we practised words with the “or” sound spelt with an “a” before “l” and “ll” (all, call, ball etc).

Explain that there is another way to spell this sound.

Read out the following words and ask the children to identify the common sound and where it is in the word:

War, warm, towards, ward, warn, award, wardrobe, reward, dwarf, swarm, wart

Elicit that in all of the words it comes after a “w”.

You could:

  • Practice writing out the words
  • Put them into sentences
  • Illustrate them
  • Try to practise some or all of them every day

 

Science

At this point in our topic on “plants” we would have been looking at the plants we had grown in and around the classroom and we would have been working out which conditions were the best to allow the plant to grow. If you have been growing plants at home, how are they getting on? How have you been looking after them? What changes have you noticed?

To widen this topic for the children I have attached a few links below to some ideas that you might want to explore from home.

 https://schoolgardening.rhs.org.uk/Resources/Activity/Art-from-the-garden

https://schoolgardening.rhs.org.uk/Resources/Spotter-Guide/Be-a-flower-spotter

https://schoolgardening.rhs.org.uk/Resources/Spotter-Guide/flowering-weeds-spotter

 

 

Week beginning: 4th May 2020 (4 days as Friday is a Bank Holiday)

Hello everyone, I hope you are all well. I can’t believe we are in May already! April flew by – let us hope that we are now edging closer to returning to school in some form. As I am sure you already know, Friday is a Bank Holiday which marks 75 years since VE Day. Mrs Gower sent home some information and suggested activities via a newsletter at the end of last week – do take a look if you are looking for ways to mark this occasion with the children. Take care, Mrs Ormerod.

 Maths

This week we would have been learning about multiplication and division. Here are a few ideas of what you could do this week:

Possible activities:

- Take a look here at a fun song and dance that recaps the concepts of multiplication and division: https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/av/supermovers/44203443

- Take a look here for a little “crib sheet” I made that shows some of the methods for multiplication and division that we use in the classroom. Your child may be more comfortable with a different method which is, of course, absolutely fine.

- Write some multiplication and division calculations. Everyone is familiar with questions involving the 2, 5, 10 times table. Some of us have also practiced questions involving the 3, 4, 6, 7 and 8 times tables. How many can you do? To make it even harder, set division questions that involve a remainder (for example, 17 divided by 5) and set multiplication questions that involve a 2 digit number multiplied by a 1 digit number (for example, 14x5). Write some for someone else in your family – did they get them right? How do you know?

- You could practice your multiplication and division by playing one of these games:

- https://www.topmarks.co.uk/maths-games/hit-the-button https://www.ictgames.com/mobilePage/doggyDivision/index.html

- Don’t forget to log in to Mathletics where I have set you some multiplication and division questions for the children that have already completed the work set in previous weeks.

 

English/Topic

This week we would have been thinking about how we know about the Great Fire of London. We would have been learning about sources of evidence and artefacts that can be used to learn about the past. One of the sources of evidence used to learn about the Great Fire of London was the diary of a man called Samuel Pepys. Take a look at this video to learn a little bit about him:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/z7d7gwx/articles/zhgxcqt

You could:

- Listen here: https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/p05w19ss where you can listen to a music tutorial all about the Great Fire of London. You can use some body percussion to join in. You will also hear some extracts from Samuel Pepys’ diary.

- Can you find out any facts about Samuel Pepys? This website might help: https://kids.kiddle.co/Samuel_Pepys What did he do with his cheese? Why? You could create a fact file showing all of the information you have found out. Feel free to present it in any format you like or you could use the template here.

- See here for a reading comprehension all about Samuel Pepys. There are a few different versions each increasing in difficulty. Choose the one you feel is most appropriate for your child.

- If you have the book “Toby and the Great Fire of London”, read to it to the end. If you do not have a copy, don’t worry - head over to the Our Lives News Plus website: http://www.ourlivestv.co.uk/pieat/stories.html where you will soon be able to listen to a recording of me reading the whole story.

- In the book, Toby talks about meeting Samuel Pepys. Imagine Toby had written a diary all about what happened to him during the Great Fire of London – what would he write? You could have a go at pretending to be Toby and writing or drawing a diary all about what happened to him and Samuel Pepys in the story. Try to put events in date order and don't forget those time words I mentioned last week and also try to use joining words such as "and", "because", "so", "that" to join your sentences together.

Spelling

Focus: common exception word practice

Please practice some of the year 2 common exception words. By the end of the year we would like all children to be able to read and spell all the words on this list: here

Choose some that you think you need to practise and work on them every day this week. Ask a grown-up to test you on your chosen words at the end of the week.

 

Week beginning: 27th April 2020

Hello everyone, I hope you are all well. It was lovely talking with all of you on the phone last week. Great to hear that the children are engaging with the activities set (no matter how much or little). Remember, all the other wonderful activities you are doing such as baking, gardening, colouring, drawing or even just talking, are just as important. Take care, Mrs Ormerod.

 

Maths

This week we would have been learning about addition and subtraction. Here are a few ideas of what you could do this week:

Possible activities:

- Take a look here for a little “crib sheet” I made that shows some of the methods for addition and subtraction that we use in the classroom. Your child may be more comfortable with a different method which is, of course, absolutely fine.

- Write some addition and subtraction calculations using numbers up to 100. How many can you do? Write some for someone else in your family – did they get them right? How do you know?

- Set up a shop using some of your toys. Give each toy a price label (up to £1). Choose 2 items to buy – how much does it cost altogether?

- Make it harder by increasing prices to more than £1 or by buying 3 items.

- You could practice your addition and subtraction by playing one of these games:

- https://www.topmarks.co.uk/maths-games/mental-maths-train

- https://www.topmarks.co.uk/maths-games/daily10 (level 2 is probably a good level to start with)

 - Don’t forget to log in to Mathletics where I have set you some addition and subtraction activities for when you have finished the place value work set last week.

 

English/Topic

Take a look at this video showing how the Great Fire of London started, spread and was eventually stopped:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Er3GKw8Z3R4

You could:

- Write/draw a timeline of what happened. What were the key events? Remember to put them in time order. Could you use some time words such as “first”, “next”, “a little while later” to help you?

- Imagine you are a newspaper reporter during the Great Fire in 1666. Write a newspaper report about what happened. You could use the template here or create your own. Try to include features such as: a catchy headline, subheadings, information/facts about the major events that happened in time order, quotes from people who were there, pictures with captions.

- If you have the book “Toby and the Great Fire of London”, read up to page 9. If you don’t have the book, Toby is a young boy who works in a paper shop in 1666. He suddenly remembers he has to make an urgent delivery but when he leaves the house “there were clouds of smoke and a red sky”. He wondered, “whatever is the matter?”

- What would you say to Toby at this point? What advice would you give him? You could pretend to be someone from 1666 and ask someone in your family to be Toby. Act out being those roles and answering the questions above.

 

Spelling

Focus: the “or” sound spelt “a” before “l” and “ll”

Recap different ways to spell the “or” sound such as “or”, “aw”, “au”, “oor”.

Can you write words that contain each of those different spellings?

Now look at these words: call, all, ball, call, walk, talk

What is the common sound? What letter is making that sound?

Elicit that the “a” is making the “or” sound and that it is usually spelt this way when it comes before a “l” or “ll”.

Read the passage attached here. Write down all the words you can find that have the “or” sound spelt with “a”. Can you put them into your own sentences?

Can you think of any other words that follow that pattern?

 

Science

This week we would have been continuing with our new topic on plants. We would have focused on the life-cycle of plants.

Take a look at this short video to help explain:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/clips/z3wsbk7

Could you now create an illustration of the life-cycle of a plant? You could set it out using a template like this or you could show it in another way (e.g, painting, play-doh)

Don’t forget to label any pictures you create. Can you include key words such as: germination, stem, leaves, bulb, seed, flower, fruit, root, shoot.

 

Week beginning: 20th April 2020

Hello everyone, I hope you are all well. Please see below for this week’s home learning updates. Feel free to do as much or as little as you would like. Don’t forget to e-mail the office with pictures of your work to be shared on the newsletter or the Selling School Facebook page. I miss you all and hope you all have a lovely week. Take care, Mrs Ormerod.

 

Maths

This week we would have been continuing with place value. Here are a few ideas of what you could do this week:

  • Investigate odd and even numbers

We learnt about these in Term 1 so the children may need reminding about how we identify an odd and even number. These videos may help: https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zknsgk7/articles/zt4jj6f

Possible activities:

- Choose some numbers up to 100 (or bigger if you want to make it harder!), sort them into odd and even piles.

- Write some numbers out on individual pieces of paper. Turn them face down then take it in turns to turn 2 cards over – can you find a pair of odd/even numbers?

- Please see here for some activity sheets and investigations all about odd and even numbers

- Have a go at one of these odd and even games:

- https://www.topmarks.co.uk/learning-to-count/coconut-odd-or-even

- https://www.ictgames.com/mobilePage/chimney/index.html

 

  • Practise adding and subtracting multiples of 10

We would have recapped adding 2 multiples of 10 (50+10) by counting on 1 lot of 10 from 50. Then moving on to adding a multiple of 10 to a number that isn’t a multiple of 10 (23+10) by recapping that in this example only the 10’s digit will change as we are adding a multiple of 10. We would then move it on to adding and subtracting multiples of 10 (45+40) to a 2 digit number by starting at 45 and counting on in 10’s (55, 65, 75, 85). Finally we would look at missing number problems (such as 66+_=86) by working out how many 10’s have been added/subtracted to get the answer.

Possible activities:

- Please see here for some questions to practice.

- Don’t forget to log in to Mathletics where I have set you some place value activities. Once you have completed these I can set you new activities. Well done to those children that have already done so!

 

English/Topic

This week we would have looked at what life was like in London in 1666. Please look at the Powerpoint here which starts with a beautiful video depicting life in 1666.

After watching the video the children could write a description of the setting. They should think about what they can see, imagine what they could smell and hear. When writing their description they should include lots of expanded noun phrases (“there were dirty, narrow alleyways”, “I can smell the over-flowing drains pouring out onto the filthy streets”). They may also try to include some similes.

You could also view the remainder of the Powerpoint which looks at different jobs that people would have done in 1666 compared to now. The children could write a job advert for one of these jobs or think about which one they would like to do and why?

 

Spelling

Focus: adding “ing”, “ed”, “er”, “est” to words ending in “y”

Using the words below, show how the word changes when you add one of the word endings from above. Elicit what happens (the “y” is changed for an “i” - except with “ing”)

copy, worry, happy, cry, reply, funny

Investigate adding the endings to the other words noted above to see how many real words you can make.

Put those words into sentences.

 Play some games with the target words such as:

- Choose one target word at a time and see how many times you can write it correctly in one minute

- Play “matching pairs” or “snap” with the target words

- Hide the words around the house and go on a “word hunt”, how many can you find in 5/10 minutes?

- Write the words out as pyramids or rainbow words (the children know what these are!)

Science

This week we would have been continuing with our new topic on plants. We would have focused on what seeds and bulbs need to grow.

This Powerpoint here should provide a good explanation with some activities and videos included.

We then would have made our own predictions of what seeds need to grow and set up an experiment by planting some seeds in different conditions.

Please see here for the planning sheet we would have used that the children may like to complete.

Of course it would be lovely if the children could still carry out that experiment at home, however, that may not be possible! Instead the children could create a poster showing what they have learnt about the conditions needed for seeds and bulbs to grow.

 

 Week beginning:  16th April 2020 (2 days) 

Firstly, I would like to say that I hope everyone had a fabulous Easter break. I’m sure chocolate was on the agenda, I just hope the Easter Bunny didn’t leave the eggs anywhere too hot so they melted! I also hope you have been able to enjoy the sunshine whether that be in your garden or out on a local walk. I have been doing lots of baking (which my children gobble up very quickly!); I’ve been doing Joe Wicks exercise most mornings (the spider-man lunges are my favourite) and I’ve been enjoying trying to make my garden look pretty. Term 5 will obviously be a bit different to what we were expecting but hopefully we will feel connected via this webpage. I will aim to suggest a variety of activities, some “paper based” but many more research led or creative in other ways. If you have any questions please feel free to e-mail the office and they will forward them on to me. Take good care, stay safe and enjoy these first couple of days of this unique term! Mrs Ormerod. 

 Maths

This week we would have been revising our knowledge of place value. Here are a few ideas of what you could do for the next 2 days:

  • If you have a dice at home, roll it twice to make a 2 digit number. Talk about the number of “tens” and “ones”, what about if you flipped the digits around – what number have you made? Can you roll it 3 times to make a 3 digit number? How many different numbers can you make by placing the digits in a different place?
  • Once you have a set of 2 and/or 3 digit numbers, put them in order smallest to biggest. Now can you add some numbers between 2 of the numbers you already have?
  • Using the symbols for greater than (>) and less than (<), compare some of the numbers that you have made. For example: 57>45 or 768<821
  • Play any of these games to recap your place value knowledge:

https://www.topmarks.co.uk/learning-to-count/place-value-basketball

http://www.ictgames.com/sharkNumbers/mobile/index.html

https://www.ictgames.com/mobilePage/lifeguards/index.htm

  • And this is a good website that allows you to demonstrate the “value” of each digit using arrow cards. We use these at school so they will be familiar to the children: https://www.ictgames.com/mobilePage/arrowCards/index.htm
  • If you would like a paper activity to complete, please see here for a set of differentiated worksheets practising greater than and less than
  • I have also set some place value activities on mathletics

 

English/Topic

This week we would have been starting a new text called “Toby and the Great Fire of London” which would link to our new topic. I have ordered the book from Amazon and am going to investigate if I am allowed to photograph extracts to share with you from next week. Of course you could purchase your own copy but there is no expectation for you to do this.

For these next 2 days you could:

  • Our new topic would have been “The Great Fire of London”. To start this topic off I would like you to write/draw what you know about modern day London. If you have been to London before what did you do/see? How was it different/the same to where you live? What transport did you use? What famous monuments or landmarks did you see/visit? Do you know why they are famous? Maybe you could find out.
  • For those of you that have not been to London or maybe just need a reminder, take a look at this video to help you answer some of the questions above.

 

Spelling

Focus: the “l” sound at the end of a word spelt with “le” or “el”

We have already learnt that the “l” sound at the end of a word can be spelt with a “le” (such as “bottle”, “little”).

This week we would have learnt that it can also be spelt with an “el” (such as “camel”, “travel”)

To explain to the children when to use “el” or “le”, the primary strategy we encourage them to use is firstly, to practice spelling each individual word so they know how that word is spelt. We also always encourage them to ask themselves “does it look right?”, “is that how I see that word in a book?”

Sometimes there are spelling “rules” that we would teach them, however, these are often tricky for them to remember, as well as trying to remember how to spell the word! For your information (and it is up to you if you want to share this with your child), with these words, the “le” is generally used if the preceding letter is either an ascender (b, d, f, h, k, l, t) or a descender (g, j, p, q, y). Otherwise, it is the “el” that is used.

 Possible activities:

  • Read the focus words here and discuss that although they all end with the “l” sound, that sound is spelt slightly differently with either a “le” or an “el”.
  • Write the words onto individual bits of paper and sort them into 2 groups according to the end spelling. And/or write them out into 2 groups according to their spelling.
  • Play some games with the target words such as:

- Choose one target word at a time and see how many times you can write it correctly in one minute

- Play “matching pairs” or “snap” with the target words

- Hide the words around the house and go on a “word hunt”, how many can you find in 5/10 minutes?

- Write the words out as pyramids or rainbow words (the children know what these are!)

- Complete the last activity on the sheet above where you have to make a word using the beginning of the word and then either “le” or “el”

 

Science

This term we would have been starting a new topic on plants. This is obviously an excellent opportunity to plant some seeds and have the time to observe them growing. (I’m trying this myself although as a bit of a novice I’m not sure how they will turn out!).

Here is a link to some ideas of what to start with when attempting to grow things with children: http://www.bbc.co.uk/gardening/gardening_with_children/plantstotry_easy1.shtml

And another with some additional ideas:

https://rainydaymum.co.uk/quick-growing-plants-kids/

To start our topic off we would have gone on a local walk around the field/garden to observe the plants and trees that are growing there. Maybe you could take a look in your garden/local area?

Please see here for a powerpoint that introduces the topic and recaps some of the learning about plants and trees from year R and 1.

Please also take a look at this video which gives a fun introduction to the parts of a plant and their function.

Once you have done those activities, your child could draw and then label a favourite plant or tree or one you have growing in your garden.

 

Good luck with the activities! Hopefully they will be enjoyable as well as educational. Please do not feel the need to complete all (or any!) of the suggested activities, they are just there as a guide should you wish to utilise them. Mrs Ormerod.

 

Week beginning: 30th March 2020

(3 days as Easter holidays would have started on Thursday 2nd April)

Firstly, I would like to say that I hope everyone is well! I miss you all and look forward to seeing you all very soon. Secondly, if you do manage to do any of the tasks mentioned here (from last week or going forward), do keep them safe as I would love to see them when we all return to school. Take care, Mrs Ormerod.

 

Maths

This week we would have been moving on to learning about statistics, specifically pictograms and bar charts. Here are a few ideas of what you could do for the next 3 days:

  • Collect some data and put it into a tally. Examples of data you could collect are:

- If you manage to get out for a walk you could count the number of each different coloured car you find

- Or the number of each different coloured front doors you see

- If you have a garden you could count the number of each different coloured flower you see

- In your house you could keep a count of the different fruits that members of your household eat

- Or you could make a tally of the different types of animal characters you find in a selection of books on your bookshelf

 

  • Once you have collected your data and put it into a tally, see if you can present that data in a pictogram or bar chart (Please click here for an example of a pictogram and here for an example of a bar chart)
  • Finally, ask some questions about your data such as “Which was the most/least popular…?” “How many…were there?” “What was the difference between the number of … and the number of …?”

 

English

This week we would have been looking at some traditional African poems.

  • Please click here to take a look at a traditional African poem. Read it together, see if you can learn sections to perform. Could you add any actions?
  • If you have any instruments at home perhaps you could use them to help you read/perform sections of the poem. Or please see here for an example of how to make an African rain-stick (along with many other ideas!) https://www.pinterest.co.uk/pin/141863456985506942/
  • Using the format of this poem see if you can add some extra verses about different African animals (for example, The Big 5). Think about the actions and noises that the animal makes. Try to keep to the structure of the original poem.

 

Spelling

Focus: words ending in –tion

Example words: fiction, station, action, motion, nation, section, fraction

Possible activities:

  • Clap and count the syllables in each word. For example “sec” and “tion” in section. Spell the first part of the word “s”, “e”, “c” and discuss any unusual spelling (e.g, the “a” in station/nation). Explain that the second syllable in each word “tion” is a tricky one as “tion” is not spelt as it sounds. Discuss how “tion” is spelt.
  • Repeat the above for each of the focus words and any others you can think of.
  • Play some games with the target words such as:

- Choose one target word at a time and see how many times you can write it correctly in one minute

- Play “matching pairs” or “snap” with the target words

- Hide the words around the house and go on a “word hunt”, how many can you find in 5/10 minutes?

- Write the words out as pyramids or rainbow words (the children know what these are!)

- Complete any or all of the attached “tion” related worksheet activities.

Please click here for a "tion" spelling activity and click here for some handwriting practice with "tion" words.

 

Topic

This would have been our last week on our topic of “Kenya”. Feel free to complete any of the home learning tasks that you haven’t completed yet. Or you could:

  • Write/draw about what you’ve enjoyed the most about the topic of “Kenya”
  • Write/draw 5 key things you have learnt about Kenya and how it compares to where we live
  • Think about whether you would like to now visit Kenya. Why/why not?
  • Write a letter to an imaginary friend who lives in Kenya and tell them all about your life and how it is similar/different to theirs in Kenya.

After Easter break I will send home weekly activities all about our new topic, “The Great Fire of London”.

 

Other

  • We would have been thinking about the The Easter Story during our RE lessons and Collective Worship time at school. There are lots of resources on Twinkl online that you can take a look at to give you some ideas. You might also want to think about writing some prayers. Perhaps around central issues such as “sacrifice”, “forgiveness”, “salvation”.

 

  • In our IT lessons we had started a new unit on “coding”. Using your child’s Purple mash login (given out before we finished school), you can access a variety of lessons and activities based around this. From the home page, select “Tools” and then “2code”. Each activity has an accompanying tutorial.

 

  • Last week I mentioned about the website Phonics Play where you can currently get free access to phonics games. I also wanted to share with you: www.phonicsplaycomics.co.uk where you can read online or download decodable comics. You can also create your own comics using the “DIY” tool.

 

  • Some of you will be familiar with the children’s newspaper “First News”. They are currently offering free downloadable issues of the newspaper as well as accompanying activity sheets. Although aimed at slightly older children (7+), there may be some news stories that are appropriate.    https://schools.firstnews.co.uk/remote-learning-resources/

 

 

 

 

 

 

Home Learning Opportunities during school closure:

 Week beginning: 23rd March 2020

English

Can you write an information page about what you have learnt about Kenya and how it compares to living in Kent? Try to include:

·        A title

·        Subheadings (think about questions you could ask such as “What is the weather like?” “What is the landscape like?”

·        Write in the 3rd person in the present tense

·        Don’t forget to use conjunctions to join your sentences (and, but, because)

·        Add illustrations with a caption

 

Please click here for report features.

Please click here for writing template.

Spelling

Adding suffixes “ful”, “less”, “ly”

 

Example spellings: careful, playful, hopeful, hopeless, careless, badly, happily

 Sometimes these suffixes change a verb into an adjective (play=playful) or an adjective into an adverb (happy=happily)

 Look carefully at the spelling of each suffix, especially:

•     single ‘l’ on ‘-ful’ (unlike the whole word ‘full’).

•     adding ‘i’ before’-ly’ and ‘-ness’ where words end in ‘y’ with a consonant before it, for example happily

•     Show how, when you add ‘-ly’ to the ‘-ful’ suffix, it has a double ‘l’, for example, hopefully.

 

Please click here to see an attached worksheet that your child can work on.

Maths

We have been learning about time for the last couple of weeks. We have been reading and drawing the time when it is o’clock, half past, quarter past/to and some of us have been reading and drawing 5 minute intervals (“10 past 3” or “twenty to 10”). The following links will provide a recap of that knowledge: 

https://mathsframe.co.uk/en/resources/resource/117/telling_the_time_in_words#

 http://www.ictgames.com/mobilePage/hickoryDickory/index.html

This week the children would have been sequencing times. They could talk about the order in which they carry out key activities during the day such as eating breakfast, lunch, dinner and going to bed. Then think about a time that these activities would happen.

Please click here to see an example of how they could record this.

 

We would then move on to solving word problems involving time.

Please click here to see some example time word problems which are ordered by difficulty.

The children will need to know that:

30 minutes = half an hour

15 minutes = ¼ of an hour

 

Other linked activities that could be done:

 

Keep a “time” diary for a day/week. What do you do at different times of the day? How long do those activities take?

 

Play “guess my time”. Someone writes/draws a time on piece of paper. Someone else has to try and guess the time by asking questions such as: “is it after 1 0’clock?” “is it a half past time?”

 

Please click here to see a Maths SATS workbook that the children could work through. Obviously SATS will now not go ahead but this is a really good summary of many of the elements of maths that we have/would have carried out in maths this year.

 

Topic

Please carry out one of the home learning tasks suggested on the home learning menu sent home at the start of term. In the next couple of weeks I will add to this with some ideas for the new topic that we would have been doing in Term 5.

Other

I will add new ideas to this section each week

Please continue to read as much as you can. I know this will be difficult with a limited supply of appropriate reading books. Local libraries do offer an online system where you can download books and audio books. 

Also please click here for more reading books online. 

Children could complete a reading journal which could contain a log of what they have read, drawings of favourite sections or characters, any new words they have come across in that book.

 

In addition, the website Phonics Play is offering a temporary free membership to all parents. Children in class 2 are working on Phase 6 but I am sure practice of phase 5 would also be valuable (and the games are fun!).

 

Here is a free downloadable pack of activities from Scholastic. You will need to register but it is free for parents at the moment:

Finally, here are a couple of links to the BBC Super Movers page where there are songs, activities and dances linked to various elements of maths and English